Sunday, 27 March 2016

Duke of Edinburgh Recommends 'Good Read'!

"The result is a fascinating read, although an unnerving one for anyone who has the tastes and appetites of Mr Toad and the income of Mr Rat." The Times.


The Duke of Edinburgh photographed leaving a Windsor Castle Easter Day Mass carrying a copy of the critically acclaimed book by David Lough on his investigation into the heretofore hidden precarious personal finances of Sir Winston Churchill. With so many years in the public eye, this could hardly be accidental, surely? It is even colour coordinated with the Queen's impeccable daffodil spring outfit. Was it intended to convey a message to public and politicians regarding the Royal finances, or of a past political leader of stature and great achievements, or even of the story from the New Testament about Christ overturning the tables of the money changers in the Temple? On the face of it it appears an inappropriate item to be carrying from a religious service commemorating the resurrection or is it? With such a notable recommendation it must be worth reading mustn't it? Many obviously think so, as it is already sold out and in a second print run.


The young girl curtsied before the Queen before handing her the Easter flowers which complimented the royal's spring outfit 




From http://www.davidlough.uk/

"Critics on  both sides of the Atlantic hail No More Champagne

‘Reads as effortlessly as a novel … [it] may become a classic. It will transform the way that Churchill is interpreted and understood’ – Tim Congdon, The New Criterion

‘ Brilliant new book’- Charles Moore, The Daily Telegraph

David Lough’s No More Champagne: Churchill and His Money is the first fully researched, lifetime narrative of Winston Churchill’s precarious private finances. It is now on sale in hardback, e-book and audio book formats. It was listed by The Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Daily Mail and The Guardian among their ‘books of the year’ for 2015; and was shortlisted for theLongman-History Today Book of the Year Prize 2016.

Churchill lived for most of his life on a financial cliff edge. The popular image may be of champagne and cigars; however, behind the scenes, his friends and family came to the rescue several times to prevent his financial problems from engulfing his political career. Only fragments of this story have so far emerged. A retired banker and history scholar of Oxford University, David Lough has unearthed new material from the unprecedented access he was given to the private records of Churchill and his associates. He now tells the fascinating and surprising story of Churchill and his finances for the first time.
Find out more about the book, how David researched it, his background and his schedule of events – andhow to order a copy with a dedication from the author – or from bookshops and Amazon.
“For ages I have been puzzled by the odd bits information, often contradictory, that have emerged about Churchill’s money problems. I was surprised to find that no one had written about the subject properly before – but even more surprised by the story that emerges from my research. It is richer than I had dared hope…”"


Who is David Lough? Biography reproduced from here: http://www.andrewlownie.co.uk/authors/david-lough

"Born in 1950, David Lough won an open history scholarship to Oxford University where he won 1st class honours, studying under historians Richard Cobb, Michael Howard and Theodore Zeldin.  He pursued a career in financial markets, starting in Asia and investment banking, before founding a private banking business in 1988.  It was sold in 2013, by which time it employed a hundred people advising many prominent families across the range of their private affairs, including their investments, tax affairs and inheritance planning.  
"A former member of the London Stock Exchange and Fellow of the Chartered Securities Institute who has acted as ‘blind trustee’ for government ministers while in office, David Lough returned to history on his retirement, using his experience to research the untold story of Winston Churchill’s tangled financial affairs.  He edited a magazine that he founded in the 1990s and has written regularly  for the wealth management industry and its publications.  An experienced public speaker at conferences and dinners, he is a member of the London Library’s Founders’ Circle.


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